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TABLE of CONTENTS



TABLE of CONTENTS...................... 2

GENERAL INFORMATION................ 3

Inspection Address.............................. 3

Client Information............................... 3

Inspection Details................................ 3

Building Details.................................... 3

PURPOSE AND SCOPE.................... 4

GENERAL COMMENTS.................... 4

EXTERIOR.................................... 5

Building Exterior.................................. 5

Windows and Doors............................ 5

Eaves, Soffits, and Fascias.................. 5

Driveway and sidewalks..................... 5

Exterior Comments............................. 5

LANDSCAPE AND SITE DRAINAGE... 8

Slope and Drainage............................. 8

Landscape Comments......................... 8

ROOF SYSTEM.............................. 9

Roof Covering...................................... 9

Flashing................................................ 9

Chimneys............................................. 9

Gutters and Downspouts.................... 9

Skylights.............................................. 9

Other Penetrations.............................. 9

Roof Ventilation................................... 9

Attic...................................................... 9

Roof Comments................................. 10

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM.................. 13

Foundation......................................... 13

Floor Structure.................................. 13

Wall Structure................................... 13

Columns and Supports...................... 13

Comments:........................................ 13

BASEMENT AND CRAWLSPACE...... 14

Basement Comments:...................... 14

PLUMBING SYSTEM..................... 16

Drain, Waste, and Venting................ 16

Water supply..................................... 16

Fuel.................................................... 16

Hot Water Heater.............................. 16

Sump Pump....................................... 16

Plumbing Comments:....................... 16

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM................... 19

Service Entry..................................... 19

Main Disconnect................................ 19

Main Panel......................................... 19

Distribution Wiring............................ 19

Sub Panel........................................... 19

Smoke Alarm Detectors.................... 19

Ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCI)     19

Electrical system Comments........... 19

HEATING SYSTEM....................... 24

Heating Systems............................... 24

Furnace.............................................. 24

Heating system Comments.............. 24

AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS....... 25

System Description........................... 25

Air conditioning comments:............. 25

INTERIOR LIVING SPACE.............. 26

General interior comments.............. 26

Kitchen............................................... 28

Kitchen Comments:.......................... 28

Bedrooms1-4.................................... 28

Room Interior – living/dinning room 28

BATHROOMS AND LAUNDRY......... 29

Bathrooms......................................... 29

Bathroom 1........................................ 29

Bathroom 2........................................ 29

Laundry Area..................................... 30

FIREPLACES AND SOLID FUEL BURNING APPLIANCES   30

GARAGE..................................... 31

Condition Comments........................ 31

SHEDS AND OUT BUILDINGS......... 33

Condition Comments........................ 33

PORCHES, DECKS, STAIRS, AND RAILINGS          33

Condition Comments........................ 33

 

 


 

 


 

GENERAL INFORMATION


 

Inspection Address

Street:

 

City:

 

State:

 

Zip:

 

Client Information

Name:

 

Address:

 

City:

 

State:

 

Zip:

 

Home#:

 

Cell#:

 

Email:

 

Release:

 

Additional

Email

 

 

Delivery:

e-mail PDF and CD by mail

Inspection Details

Inspection Date:

07-03-06

Start time:

12:30 pm

Finish time:

3:30 pm

Temperature:

80’s

Weather Conditions:

Overcast

Report Delivered:

07-04-06

Fee Paid:

$365 Paid in full with check #1455

Parties present:

Buyer’s and sellers agent

Building Details

Style:

Single family 2 story

Approximate Age:

38+years

Bedrooms:

4

Bathrooms:

1.5

Basement:

Partial/ crawl, unfinished

Outbuildings:

Shed

Approximate Sq Ft:

2100 per realtor

Sale Price:

232,700

MLS#

 

Occupied:

Yes

Entrance Faces:

West

 

PURPOSE AND SCOPE


 

  1. This Sample Inspection report was an actual inspection. Every home is different and all homes have concerns and need for repair or maintenance.
  2. Each report is written specifically for your home. I have a few boilerplate narratives for common defects, but seldom do they adequately describe the site specific concerns.
  3. I regularly spend three or more hours at each inspection but I spend even more time compiling a comprehensive report. I can give references from past clients and copies of actual reports if desired (less personal information).
  4. Other inspectors use carbon copy checklists and illegible notes in the margins.
  5. I routinely find numerous problems on homes of all ages and styles. Some of the problems are obviously improper and others are more obscure.
  6. A popular misconception is if the home is new it should not have any problems. I usually find several concerns with new homes that are not inspected by municipal code inspectors. These have to do with quality of construction and yes even code violations. I often find items not properly installed or unfinished but operational. I recently found a roof that lack underlayment and the builder had to tear off the shingles and re-shingle the roof.

 

GENERAL COMMENTS


  1. In the general comments sections I often highlight some of the larger issues specific to the home.
  2. This home has undergone some recent repairs or additions that would have required permits. I noted several code related defects that would have been flagged if the work was inspected. This usually indicates lack of permits and amateur workmanship. Please inquire about recent permits at the municipal building department. If permits were not obtained have the seller obtain proper permits and inspections. Failure to do this prior to purchase can result in personal liability for previous permit related fines and repair to close open permits.
  3. Due to the homes age and construction methods of the times, there are many aspects of the home that are not up to today’s standards in construction and safety. Please read the recommendations carefully and please call for further clarification if necessary. I can explain some options for repairs or upgrades but methods vary greatly so I recommend researching options and hiring qualified contractors to complete the work. Please acquire permits for repairs. This ensures the best safety practices and documents the work for future reference.

 

           

 


 

EXTERIOR


Building Exterior

Siding Material:

Painted aluminum

Wall Trim:

Aluminum/ wood

Windows and Doors

Window type:

Single pane with storm/screen

Material:

Aluminum/wood

Door Type:

panel

Material:

Wood

Eaves, Soffits, and Fascias

Type:

Unvented

Material:

Aluminum

Driveway and sidewalks

Driveway Material:

Asphalt and concrete

Sidewalk Material:

Concrete

Flatwork Material:

Na

Exterior Comments

  1. The exterior Aluminum siding was fading. Some minor caulking is needed at joints and openings were siding meets trim.
  2. The driveway had several cracks and pitting. Fill and maintain cracks to prevent water damage from freezing and expanding. The parking area has a small retaining wall and uses large pipes to help hold soil in place beneath the slab in place. The wall is not adequate and it appears the slab has settled. This will likely continue slowly over years unless a better retaining wall is constructed and water is sealed out of joints.
  3. The shutters had some deterioration of paint and some wood damage.
  4. The basement windows were rotting and poorly sealed. I recommend replacement of basement windows with new maintenance free type or glass block.
  5. The windows in the home were all in similar condition. They had aluminum storm screen combos installed and the interior wood windows were single pane. These types of windows are not as efficient as modern windows and there is some need for maintenance currently. The windows need cleaning, caulk, re-glazing, and paint in various locations. The sill of the picture window was deteriorated and several layers of caulk exist indicating leakage and past repairs. Remove buildup of caulk and repair or maintain as needed.
  6. The home has a series of solar panels on the south gable end. This system has several ducts installed to circulate warm air captured within the panels. Several problems exist with this installation making it susceptible to problems and its current conditions warrant several repairs. Typically I recommend evaluating the repair cost with the benefit. Since there are numerous glass panels that are broken and all the seals and panel sections are deteriorated I would consider removal of the system. There are ducts that have plywood boxes located in closets and the ceiling in the lower hall. The insulated ducts in the attic and the other ducts are in poor condition and may actually loose heat in winter when the sun is not able to raise the air temperature in the panels above interior temperature. There may also be similar moisture concerns from panel seals. The removal of the panels would require re-siding the area and removal of ducts and sealing and insulating holes.

 

Cracks in concrete drive

Fading siding, chalking paint

Example of caulking needed

Large picture window sill, caulk and paint deteriorated.

 

Ungrounded outlet, needs GFCI protection

Example of shutter condition

Basement windows deteriorated

Wood rot evident in basement windows

Solar heating panels damaged near window

Several panes cracked

 

 

LANDSCAPE AND SITE DRAINAGE


Slope and Drainage

Direction of Lot Slope:

Relatively flat around the home

Downspouts Drain:

Into drain pipes that exit onto grade away from the home

Swales/Ditches:

NA

Retaining walls:

NA

Landscape Comments

1.      Landscaping and lot topography can have a significant impact on the building structure. It is important that surface runoff water is adequately diverted away from the building, especially in areas that have expansive soil characteristics. Low spots or depressions in the topography can result in ponding water that may exert hydrostatic pressure against the foundation. This pressure can cause a variety of effects on the building. A similar impact can result from tree roots growing against the foundation and causing cracking or movement of the structure. It is a standard recommendation that the lot grading slopes away from the building. Grading should fall a minimum of one inch every foot for a distance of six feet around the perimeter of the building. It is also important that tree branches are not permitted to overhang the roof and that all landscaping is kept well pruned and not permitted to grow up against any part of the building. This will help prevent the development of pest and insect problems.

2.      The sump drain discharge line connects to an underground pipe but the exit point was not verified.

3.      There is raised flower bed in the yard that appears to have been added around mature trees. This suffocates the roots of the trees and they appear stressed and will likely need to be removed in the next few years.

 

Flower bed, trees stressed

Sump discharge line


 

ROOF SYSTEM


Roof Covering

Roof Inspected:

Walked on surface

Roofing Materials:

Composite asphalt

Estimated life:

End of useful life

Flashing

 

Flashing Type:

Galvanized, aluminum

Flashing Locations:

Drip edge, gable end

Chimneys

 

Chimneys Type:

Masonry

Flue type:

Clay tile

Flashing:

Galvanized

Gutters and Downspouts

 

 Type:

Aluminum

Skylights

 

Type:

NA

Location:

Na

Flashing:

Na

Other Penetrations

 

Type:

Plumbing vent

Location:

Main gable

Roof Ventilation

 

Type:

Power vent gable end vent

Location:

Main upper gable and garage

Attic

Access Locations:

Hallway scuttle, garage

Observation:

Entered attic

Insulation Type:

Fiberglass

Insulation Measure:

+/- 6”

Approximate R-Value:

R19

Ventilation Type:

Power vent

 

 

Roof Comments

  1. The roof had multiple layers of shingles and the roof is in need of replacement. The shingles are brittle, curled, granules missing, and rain tabs widening. Because there is multiple layers there will be additional cost in removing the old shingles. The roof will need better ventilation when re-roofing.
  2. The attic had 2 power vents installed, one was located in garage. These fans blow outward and can move a sufficient amount of air, but they use electricity. The thermostat controls were not tested. The fans would also benefit from an adequate source of air. Since they blow outward they can create a low pressure area in the attic which can draw air from any openings in the home creating heat loss. The gable end vents were partially blocked.
  3. The attic had minimal insulation. I recommend adding additional insulation to reach a desired level of R-40 or greater. Do not use faced insulation.
  4. The chimneys were in need of minor tuck pointing. The chimney serving the fire place had a cap and the flue was not visible. Have the chimney cleaned and inspected by a chimney sweep prior to use. The other chimney was serving the water heater. The flue had some cracks and the masonry needs some repairs to minor cracks and deteriorated mortar. Have a cap installed to prevent rain from entering the chimney. Have the flashing replaced when re-roofing.

 

 

Multiple layers

Deteriorated shingles

Deteriorated shingles

Remove wood strips

Deteriorated shingles

Deteriorated shingles

Deteriorated shingles

Gutters improper slope and granules

Chimney needs minor repairs and cap

Power vent hood

Attic vent fan in garage

Solar ducting in attic


 

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM


Foundation

Type:

Concrete block

Floor Structure

Floor framing:

2x10 16” O.C.

Sheathing:

Plywood

Wall Structure

Wall framing:

2x4”

Sheathing:

Not visible

Columns and Supports

Material:

Steel

Location:

Center support in basement

 Comments:

  1. The north wall had a large workbench and pegboard on the wall. Next to this I noted two horizontal cracks typical of a bowing wall condition. The pegboard and bench conceal the extent of the problem. The peg board will need to be removed to determine the significance of the cracks and accurate measurements of the wall should be made to see if bracing is necessary. This can be done by foundation repair specialist or structural engineer.
  2. There were other minor settlement cracks located in the foundation. These appear to be insignificant cracks. The foundation for the fireplace had a few larger cracks and movement evidence noted that appear to be minor and not of structural significance.

 

Horizontal cracks in wall

Bowing visible in peg board area

 

 

BASEMENT AND CRAWLSPACE


Type:

Full/ unfinished crawlspace

Ventilation:

Na

Access:

Stairs from interior

Wall coverings:

Unfinished concrete block, some panel

Floor coverings:

Concrete

Drainage:

Yes floor drain near furnace

Basement Comments:

  1. The area under the front porch had some water stains. These may have been from construction. The wood in this area and else ware in the basement is supposed to be pressure treated. The decay of this wood is typically very slow but if allowed to remain damp they can cause mold growth and rapid decay. There was a minor exposure of re-bar. The outlets and lighting should be damp location type. The ventilation appears to have originally been intended for a root-cellar type but has been altered to minimize air movement.
  2. The crawl space floor was OSB plywood. The floor may have been gravel or dirt originally and the wood frame added. The construction was not visible but often is not done properly. The framing should have been pressure treated and a vapor barrier and insulation installed. This can be done in numerous ways but if done improperly it can cause wood decay and moisture entrapment under floor and other related problems. The lighting for this is hazardous because it can cause fire. The lighting will need to be changed to florescent covered fixtures suitable for storage location.

 

Vent and water stains on untreated wood

Exposed rebar

 

Untreated wood in contact with masonry

Flood light for crawl space is fire hazard

Step settlement cracks under chimney, fireplace

Old crack repair


 

PLUMBING SYSTEM


Drain, Waste, and Venting

 Drain Material:

PVC, copper, cast-iron

Septic type:

Municipal

Cleanout:

Yes

Water supply

Supply material:

Copper

Source:

Municipal

Main shut off:

Yes

Storage Tank:

No

Fuel

Supply material:

Black pipe

Source:

Municipal

Main shut off:

Yes at meter

Storage:

No

Hot Water Heater

Type:

Insulated Tank

Energy source:

Natural gas

Capacity:

40 Gallons

Venting:

Galvanized flue into chimney

Approx. Age:

Unknown

Sump Pump

Type:

Open crock

Tested:

Yes

Plumbing Comments:

  1. The utility sink in hall was added improperly. The drain is not vented and the slope and connection is improper. The joist were notched or drilled and this weakens them and they will need to be repaired. The supply uses rubber washer hoses and the piping was done poorly and subject to failure. The entire sink configuration will need to be repaired by a plumber.
  2. The dishwasher was not properly connected to the sewer drain. The current configuration is improper and can allow sewer gasses to build up in dishwasher and could cause explosion. Have this repaired immediately.
  3. Several pipes were in need of additional support. Add hangers to reduce chance of fatigue on joints and potential failure.

 

Hallway utility sink unvented

Improper dishwasher drain

Improper drain, poor connections

Washer and utility sink supply

Hoses supply utility sink

Improper drain and joist notching weakens joist

 

Unsupported pipe

Needs better support


 

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM


Service Entry

Drop Type:

Overhead

Entry Conductor:

Copper

Voltage/Amperage:

220v 60 amp

Meter Location:

North side of home

Ground Conductor:

Copper

Ground Location:

rod not visible, water pipe

Main Disconnect

Type:

Meter

Amperage Rating:

60 amp

Location:

North side of home

Main Panel

 Location:

Basement

Panel Style:

breaker

Amperage Rating:

100 amp

Voltage Rating:

220v

Distribution Wiring

Wiring Type:

Shielded copper, conduit

Sub Panel

Location:

NA

Amperage Rating:

Na

Smoke Alarm Detectors

Smoke Alarms:

Yes

Carbon monoxide:

No

Ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCI)

 

Required Location:

Kitchen, Bathrooms, Basement, Laundry, Garage, Exterior, moist areas

 Found Locations:

Kitchen, bathrooms, exterior

Electrical system Comments

1.      The home is supplied by a 60 amp service. The meter socket and service drop appear to be rated for 60 amp service. The main breaker panel is 100 amps. It is common to see the panel changed but the service drop not upgraded. Have an electrician evaluate the service and determine recommended service size by doing a load calculation for the homes demands. 60 amp service is not considered adequate for a modern household.

2.      Testing a sample amount of outlets revealed an inconsistent voltage drop under load. When a 15-amp load was applied to the circuit the line voltage dropped 8-11.5% any voltage drops over 5% are considered out of acceptable range per manufactures standards. The most common causes for this are excessive length of the wire in the circuit or poor connections. The connections most often responsible are push-in type receptacles. This wiring method (also called speed wiring) is acceptable by NEC code, but often results in poor connections. The solution to this is using the screw type terminals for a better connection. This condition needs to be further evaluated by a qualified electrician to determine the quality of connections.

3.      The conduit to the whirlpool tub circuit is not supported or secured adequately. The circuit is rated for 20 amps but the panel label indicates it serves lighting also. Since the wiring appears amateur I suspect the wire size was not configured properly in lighting circuit. Have an electrician evaluate circuit.

4.      The main panel had an aluminum circuit wire this could be one a singe circuit or it could be present in other locations not visible. The problem with aluminum wiring is the connections corrode and can cause resistance and heat. Aluminum wiring has been the cause of numerous fires and needs to be evaluated by an electrician to determine its condition or replace as needed.

5.      The AC circuit disconnects are in need of repair. The disconnects are redundant and they lack a continuous ground. The panel interior cover was broken. Have an electrician repair AC circuit as needed.

6.      The ½ bath GFCI failed. The exterior GFCI on the deck was not operational, and the exterior outlet on the front of the home lacked a ground and GFCI.

7.      The water pipes, gas pipes, and duct work lack proper electrical bonding to ground. This is done by using a wire to connect the metal components to a good ground whenever isolated by a non-conductive union. The water heater would be a place where the pipes should be bonded to ground. Ask and electrician to verify and install proper bonding.

8.      I always recommend addition of carbon monoxide detectors be placed near furnace and other fossil fuel burning appliances and near living and sleeping areas. Carbon monoxide is a by product of combustion of fossil fuels. It is normally vented out of the structure via the chimney etc. but if the system fails it can cause severe illness or death to the occupant of the home.

9.      I always recommend outlets located in moist areas be changed to GFCI type. They are require in Kitchen, Bathrooms, Basement, Laundry, Garage, Exterior, and moist areas. They are a relatively inexpensive safety feature meant to disconnect power with the slightest current drain in milliseconds. If they are already installed I recommend periodic testing as it is common that a small percentage of these devices fail with time.

10.  Another similar safety upgrade would be the use of AFCI protected circuits. These are similar to GFCI outlets but protect against an arc from an electrical short that can cause fires. AFCI or Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters are now required in new construction in all bedrooms.

 

 

Service drop appears to be 60 amp

60 amp meter socket

GFCI outlet not operational

Ungrounded AC disconnect

Voltage drop 11.5% in living room

Dimmer feature not operational

Improperly wired lamp

Open junction and unsupported wires in attic

Improper wiring to attic fan thermostat

Cellar outlet, lighting, needs GFCI, damp location

Small wire acting as ground

Knockouts missing

Loose outlet box

Ungrounded Disconnect

Aluminum wiring present

Poor connection, sloppy wiring

 

Poor conduit support, wire to whirlpool tub

 


 

HEATING SYSTEM


Heating Systems

Type of Heating System:

Natural gas forced air

Heating System Location:

Basement

 Venting:

Direct vent PVC

Ducting, Supply Air:

Galvanized metal

Ducting, Return Air:

Galvanized metal

Controls:

Thermostat

Fuel Source, Location:

Municipal

Fuel Piping:

Black pipe

Furnace

Make:

Carrier

Model:

58SXA080-gg

BTU:

88,000

Serial:

3491A06008

Approximate age:

1991

Last Service Date:

2004

Filtration:

Pleated Filter

Heating system Comments

1.      The furnace appears to be operating normally but this type of inspection is limited and I always recommend having the furnace tested by a HVAC technician prior to close of escrow. A technician can disassemble and test using specialized tools and methods to determine if the furnace is operating safely. The furnace should also be cleaned and serviced at this time and then serviced regularly. There was some gas odor briefly during startup phase that can indicate a minor leak from gas valve. The top of furnace had some water stains that could be from leaking condensate. The furnace was dirty inside the cabinet and should be serviced.


 

AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS


 

 

System Description

Energy source:

Electric

Approximate age:

1991

Disconnect:

Adjacent to unit

Location:

East side of home

Controls:

Thermostat

Make:

Carrier

Model:

38TKB036300

Serial:

2891E28239

Air conditioning comments:

1.      The air-conditioning operated as normal but I always recommend having the system fully inspected by a qualified HVAC technician prior to close of escrow. They can test refrigerant levels and inspect component only visible when disassembled using specialized tools and equipment. The equipment should also be cleaned and serviced at this time and then on a regular basis to keep it operating efficiently.

2.      The electrical service has some concerns noted in electrical section.

 


INTERIOR LIVING SPACE


General interior comments

  1. The home was furnished and often the furnishings and personal belongings inhibit the inspection.
  2. Minor cosmetic flaws are not reported or inspected.
  3. The home had some typical cracks noted in several locations; these appear to be insignificant and are typical of a home of this age. Some slight blisters in paint were noted in dining room and living room. These can be indicators of water leakage moisture problems or simple paint failure. The cause was not obvious but the areas were small and not of major concern.
  4. The floors squeaked in several areas. No obvious cause for this was noted but there were several nails missing the floor joist noted in basement and additional blocking can be added or nail the sub floor when replacing carpets or other floor covering. The stairs also squeaked.
  5. Whenever an open bulb light is located in a closet or storage area it is a hazard for fire and needs to be replaced with a covered florescent fixture to reduce chance of breakage and fire.
  6. The hardwood floors had a few minor chips or blemishes but overall the floors will need a new finish to protect it from stains.

 

Blister in corner of dinning room

Crack under window

Solar air vent, possible moisture leakage

Drips on couch beneath vent

Deteriorated finish on wood floors

Open bulb in closet

Minor defects in floor

Typical fan, several rooms, wobbles and vibrates

 

Kitchen

Wall covering:

Painted drywall, wood

Floor covering:

Linoleum

Ceiling covering:

Painted drywall

Countertops:

Laminate

Cabinetry:

Wood, plywood

Plumbing fixture:

Cast-iron

Heat source:

Noted

Ventilation:

Windows

Lighting:

General

GFCIs:

Yes

Smoke alarm:

In hall

Kitchen Comments:

1.      The dimmer switch didn’t operate.

2.      the dishwasher drain was improper and will need to be repaired

 

Bedrooms1-4

Wall Coverings:

Painted drywall

Floor Coverings:

Wood

Ceiling Covering:

Painted drywall

Doors:

Wood hollow core

Windows:

Wood single pane double hung

Smoke Alarm:

In hall

Heat Source:

Noted

Bedrooms1-4 Comments:

1.      No additional concerns noted.

 

Room Interior – living/dinning room

Wall Coverings:

Painted drywall

Floor Coverings:

Carpet

Ceiling Covering:

Painted drywall

Doors:

Wood hollow core

Windows:

Wood single pane double hung

Smoke Alarm:

No

Heat Source:

Noted

Comments:

 

1.      It appears that the ductwork for solar heat leaks. The couch under had a water and rust stain. This may not be related but appears to be from duct above. Water vapors can condense in ductwork and drip. This could indicate a condition where the solar panels are creating a moisture concern as noted above.

2.      There were some minor blisters and blemishes to the paint in these rooms. None were consistent enough to determine exact cause.

3.      No additional concerns noted.

BATHROOMS AND LAUNDRY


Bathrooms

Number of Bathrooms:

1.5

Bathroom 1

Location:

2nd floor main

Ventilation:

Vent fan

Wall covering:

Painted drywall

Floor covering:

Tile

GFCIs:

Yes

Shower material:

Tile

Tub Material:

Fiberglass whirlpool

Sink and counter:

Wood cabinet laminate top, porcelain bowls

Heat source:

Noted

Bathroom 1 Comments:

1.      The closet door lacked knob latch.

2.      The hand held shower head diverter didn’t function and had no holder.

 

Bathroom 2

Location:

1st floor half

Ventilation:

Vent fan

Wall covering:

Painted drywall

Floor covering:

Parquet wood

GFCI’s:

Failed to trip

Shower material:

NA

Tub Material:

NA

Sink and counter:

Pedestal

Heat source:

Noted

Bathroom 1 Comments:

1.      The floor was slightly damaged under toilet. The tank was sweating and is the likely cause but the toilet seal at base or other source of leak may have caused water damage. The tank is large and uses several gallons per flush. I recommend upgrading to a more efficient model with an insulated tank to prevent sweating.

2.      The GFCI failed to trip when tested and will need to be replaced.

 

Water damage to floor

Failed to trip

 

 

Laundry Area

Location:

Basement

Ventilation:

Na

Wall covering:

Unfinished

Floor covering:

Concrete

GFCIs:

No

Sink and counter:

Double bowl cast tub

Heat source:

No

Laundry Comments:

1.      No concerns.

FIREPLACES AND SOLID FUEL BURNING APPLIANCES


Fireplace Type:

Full insert in masonry chimney

Location:

Living room

Fuel Type:

Wood

Air supply:

Interior air

Exhaust Venting:

Conventional chimney, not visible (see  Roof/Chimney section)

Fireplace Comments

  1. The fire place insert didn’t have an outlet wired for blower motor. The fire brick base inside the firebox was deteriorated. Some creosote was visible. The flue and damper design prohibit visual inspection. Have the fireplace cleaned and inspected by a chimney sweep prior to use. Some disassembly is required to properly clean and inspect the fireplace.
  2. The mantel and the brick surround had some signs of movement. Minor cracks were noted around edges and in basement crawlspace. These appear to be settlement cracks and not of concern. Some movement is normal between wood framing and masonry fireplace.

 

Cord for blower

Firebrick deteriorated

 

 

 

GARAGE


Structure type:

Attached 2 car

Electrical service:

Supplied by house

GFCIs:

No

Foundation:

Concrete slab

Siding:

Same as house

Windows:

Fixed

Lighting:

General

Roof:

Asphalt shingle

Drainage:

No

Interior walls:

Open framing

Interior ceiling:

Open frame

Floor:

Concrete

Insulation:

Not visible

Fire Wall:

Yes

Fire Door:

Yes

Service door:

yes

Overhead door:

Yes composite panel

Opener:

Yes with optical reverse

Condition Comments

  1. The garage and adjacent attic area had some venting concerns similar to the attic of the main portion of the house. The vent fan was located in garage and doesn’t adequately serve the attic area above the living room. The attic area should be vented separately and the screened area above needs to be blocked for fire wall separation requirements.
  2. The storage area above garage was not properly framed and will need significant alteration to adequately support storage. The framing of the roof was done lightly when originally constructed and several rafters have splices or joints resting on a beam that is insufficient in size. Then the storage area was added which compounded the problem. The roof was visibly sagging several inches when observed from driveway. The weight of storage and roofing material, and inadequacies in framing over the years has made the roof sag. There are several repairs necessary. And the special considerations if storage space is desired. Consult a qualified contractor, and have the design reviewed by a structural engineer or architect.
  3. All wires in garage should be in conduit when in reach. All outlets should be GFCI.
  4. The garage door is heavy and didn’t operate smoothly. The track was not aligned well. If a heavy garage door fails it can cause injury or damage to vehicles. Have the door tracks adjusted and all connections tightened.

 

 

Storage area, inadequate framing

Garage track misaligned

Door not aligned well needs adjustment

Splices above beam, roof rafters

 

SHEDS AND OUT BUILDINGS


Structure:

Tool shed

Location:

Corner of lot

Condition Comments

  1. The shed was in poor condition; the roof was deteriorated and will need to be replaced. Since the shed has been altered many times it would need many repairs depending on its intended use.

PORCHES, DECKS, STAIRS, AND RAILINGS


 Type:

Wood deck

Material:

Pressure treated and stained wood

Location:

Back of home

Condition Comments

  1. The deck was very well built and the post appears to be bolted and quality materials used. The stain has faded and peeled and will need to be reapplied. The deck should be properly cleaned and any splinters or repairs made prior to refinishing. The decks height didn’t allow for a complete inspection of the structure. The lighting was not visible for inspection.
  2. The GFCI was not operational.